Can you publish fanfiction on Amazon Kindle?

Kate
02.09.2012
Kate

As in, are you legally allowed to publish your own works featuring someone else's characters (such as from Star Trek, or Sherlock Holmes) to make money?

Mitch
02.09.2012
Mitch

You aren't allowed to legally publish fanfiction at all, period. The only exception I believe is if you have the authors permission, which will never happen.

Laptopgirl
02.09.2012
Laptopgirl

Yeah maybe cuz once I saw this book at a store called Harry potty not harry potter. It was a funny comic based on harry potter characters. But i didnt buy that book. It was too expensive! So yeah I think you can but you still should take permission from the original writer or hire a lawyer. Please answer my question too I am need urgent help please! Thank u!

Jude
02.09.2012
Jude

Yes if you get permission from the original author (holder of copyright) and pay them any fee which they feel is appropriate for you to use their work. I would imagine it would not be financially feasible.

Steven J Pemberton
02.09.2012
Steven J Pemberton

No. You must have all the necessary rights and/or licenses to everything you publish through Kindle Direct Publishing. To publish fanfiction, you would need permission from whoever owned the characters, which you won't get unless you're already a well-known author.

An exception is you're writing fanfiction about public domain characters - those where the original author has been dead for more than 70 years. Nobody owns them any more, so you can write about them without permission.

cathrl69
02.09.2012
cathrl69

Star Trek? No.

Sherlock Holmes is out of copyright, so write away.

raina_vissora
03.09.2012
raina_vissora

It depends. If the original work is old enough to be in the public domain, then all copyrights have expired… You can do whatever you want with it completely legally.

If it is NOT in the public domain, you would need the permission of the copyright holder to publish anything commercially.

Star Trek is not in the public domain. Sherlock Holmes, though, is, if I recall correctly.

Guest
20.11.2013
Guest

Many *parodies* of Harry Potter have been published. That's what fair use is all about-- parodying, poking fun at, commenting on, etc., is certainly permissible free speech. Alice Walker's The Wind Done Gone is a perfect example-- Margaret Mitchell's heirs sued her to no avail; her work was ruled a literary parody. And the ACD heirs are actually trying to claim that SH as a character is still in copyright because of the few original stories that are. (!) At some point, you just have to stop milking it.